Notes on expository essay

What you write must be relevant to the prompt - not just the Context - the prompt! By my estimates this would account for at least half of the mistakes people make when writing Context pieces. The most frequent pitfall is to fall into the mindset of 'ooh, look, the prompt is about innocence and guilt. I wrote a practice essay on that yesterday; I'll just write the exact same thing' with no consideration of the overall message that the prompt is giving you.

What Is an Expository Essay?

Approaches that limit themselves to unpacking a few key words and just writing about those words and not their overall suggestions are very, very risky and straight-up wrong in my opinion. Putting aside thoughts of essay structure for the moment, you should always go into a piece with the understanding that the prompt rules everything. You're not writing on the context eg. So it's not enough for a piece to just address the words in the prompt and relate them to the overall study - it's about using what you know, choosing the most relevant ideas and discussions, and then tailoring them to suit the framework that you're given.

This category also technically includes 'exploration' as well, and this is where the idea of a contention comes into play. That's because it's got sufficient breadth.

Expository Essay Notes

We've covered more ground than just 'YES. If there's too much depth, the kiddies are going to drown. But you could take that same amount of water and spread it out really thin so it's nice and safe Yes I'm equating Year 12 assessors with non-waterproof toddlers. So sue me. Instead, you should be using other sources in order to aid your discussion.

How to Write an Expository Essay | Essay Tigers

The kinds of examples you draw from and the degree to which you stick with the set text are entirely up to you, and most of this stuff falls under the 'just do it well, we don't care how' mentality. Some students are adept at pulling apart intricate details of their set text and using them to further discussion; others simply get the textual discussion out of the way, and then move on to other examples and discussions that they find more interesting.

How to Plan & Write an Expository Essay

It mostly comes down to how much you enjoy the text, or how many interesting ideas you think it contains. Personally, I found both of mine hellishly dry and bland, so I tended to tick this criteria as soon as possible, and then go back to making my piece interesting again :p Importantly, though; there is no requirement to give a sense of the full text. If, in a T. You don't need to know your Context texts anywhere near as well as you're meant to know your T.

Quotes from the latter should be etched into your memory before the exam, but you don't even need textual quotes for Context You can use them if you wish, but it's not like they're a requirement for doing well. Nevertheless, I've heard some teachers say 'you must use at least 5 quotes in every paragraph to show you have enough evidence' and other say 'never use quotes - they're clunky and unnecessary - you're not allowed to use them. If you're lucky, they'll be sane and flexible, but most teachers are partial to certain styles or ways of integrating the text, and it's in your best interests to cater to their interests.

In the exam, however, you don't have to bend to anyone's rules - you're just trying to write what is objectively safe in the eyes of assessors.

Expository Essay: Simple Tips

Another cautionary tale I hope this is somewhat helpful! For starters: Context is essentially a big open ended pit of 'do what you want so long as you do it well' much to the displeasure of basically everyone. What you write must be relevant to the prompt - not just the Context - the prompt! By my estimates this would account for at least half of the mistakes people make when writing Context pieces. The most frequent pitfall is to fall into the mindset of 'ooh, look, the prompt is about innocence and guilt.

I wrote a practice essay on that yesterday; I'll just write the exact same thing' with no consideration of the overall message that the prompt is giving you. Approaches that limit themselves to unpacking a few key words and just writing about those words and not their overall suggestions are very, very risky and straight-up wrong in my opinion. Putting aside thoughts of essay structure for the moment, you should always go into a piece with the understanding that the prompt rules everything.


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You're not writing on the context eg. So it's not enough for a piece to just address the words in the prompt and relate them to the overall study - it's about using what you know, choosing the most relevant ideas and discussions, and then tailoring them to suit the framework that you're given. This category also technically includes 'exploration' as well, and this is where the idea of a contention comes into play.

That's because it's got sufficient breadth. We've covered more ground than just 'YES. If there's too much depth, the kiddies are going to drown. But you could take that same amount of water and spread it out really thin so it's nice and safe Yes I'm equating Year 12 assessors with non-waterproof toddlers. So sue me. Instead, you should be using other sources in order to aid your discussion.

The kinds of examples you draw from and the degree to which you stick with the set text are entirely up to you, and most of this stuff falls under the 'just do it well, we don't care how' mentality. Some students are adept at pulling apart intricate details of their set text and using them to further discussion; others simply get the textual discussion out of the way, and then move on to other examples and discussions that they find more interesting.

It mostly comes down to how much you enjoy the text, or how many interesting ideas you think it contains. Personally, I found both of mine hellishly dry and bland, so I tended to tick this criteria as soon as possible, and then go back to making my piece interesting again :p Importantly, though; there is no requirement to give a sense of the full text. If, in a T.

Expository Essay Outline

You don't need to know your Context texts anywhere near as well as you're meant to know your T. Quotes from the latter should be etched into your memory before the exam, but you don't even need textual quotes for Context You can use them if you wish, but it's not like they're a requirement for doing well.

Nevertheless, I've heard some teachers say 'you must use at least 5 quotes in every paragraph to show you have enough evidence' and other say 'never use quotes - they're clunky and unnecessary - you're not allowed to use them.

If you're lucky, they'll be sane and flexible, but most teachers are partial to certain styles or ways of integrating the text, and it's in your best interests to cater to their interests.